Coast to Coast 2006

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Footloose Librarians' Coast to Coast Journal
Day 13

Day 13: Clay Bank Top to Glaisdale
Sunday 17th September 2006

Another misty moisty morning followed a mostly clear night. We got a somewhat late start, as our ride back to Clay Bank had to wait on breakfast service.

The walk began with a sharp climb up from the pass to Carr Ridge and then along Urra Moor. What followed was a mostly gentle ramble across the moor top and then gradually down to join the path of a dismantled mining railway which follows the contours high up above the valleys to the south. Along the way we rejoined Anna, whose jaunty stride was recognizable far ahead of us, accompanied as always by her irrepressible dog Yorick, bounding through the heather, his white tail a waving flag
in the purple. Shortly afterwards we also came upon Tom and Jane, with whom we'd spent a companionable afternoon several days earlier in the pub at Danby Wiske, lunching beside the path. All were planning to end the day at Blakey Ridge, but we had farther to go and so we walked on.

Have I mentioned that I love my boots? They've taken good care of me for twelve days of walking. My feet have at times been sore, but never wounded. Now a word about socks - specifically new socks. I'd always been warned to wash them before wearing a new pair, but with the shortage of laundry opportunities I'd bought new socks at a walker's shop in Osmotherly and hadn't had time to do the washing. Wore them for the first time this morning and learned the hard way why people advise washing - only two hours into an undemanding walk, I developed a blister on the heel, and had to stop to patch the damage (and change socks).

We left the railway path for a short climb up to Blakey Ridge and the Lion Inn, where we rested and ate lunch. On a busy Sunday afternoon the people-watching in their grassy front garden is just great.

Refreshed, we pushed on for the final nine miles to Glaisdale and a planned rendezvous with my (Steve's) wife Vicki, who's been travelling for the last 18 hours to meet us. The path continues by zigging north and east with several miles of road walking, north along a busy A road, then east a mile of so before cutting north to the intriguingly named Great Fryup Lane, with its suggestion of hearty breakfast. It then leaves the road for a high path across the crest above Great Fryup Dale and briefly back on a paved road before ascending gradually along a bridle way to the hilltop above Glaisdale. On a clearer day it might be possible to catch a first glimpse of the North Sea, but not today.

Glaisdale hides itself below the hill until you are almost in the village. We walked steeply downhill on the west side, choosing that route over the steeper path through town. Found some sweet deadfall apples beside the road, tucked them away for tomorrow's lunch, and at last found our home for the nigh,. the Arncliffe Arms. Vicki, who had enjoyed herself with the freedom of a rental car travelling cross country from Manchester, joined us a little later, and we enjoyed a great meal, including a sample of the excellent custom-brewed beer served only there, named after the nearby Beggar's Bridge.

A long day - 18 miles - but a good walk.
 

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